BIOPAC® Systems, Inc. Logo

SPO2 FO Sensor for MRI

Extend Discovery into the MRI

Advanced technology for MRI-based research

SpO2 sensor for MRI - Fiber optic
Part #: OXY-MRI-SENSOR

This is a fiber optic pulse oximetry finger sensor for the OXY-MRI SpO2 System.

The sensor is for adult human use and has a 9 m fiber-optic cable to pass through the wave guide (sensor is attached to the subject in the MRI chamber room, cable passes through wave guide, SpO2 amplifier is in the MRI control room).

One sensor is included with the OXY-MRI System.

Two self-adhering wraps are included with each sensor.

Login for pricing

   Request More Info
BIOPAC data acquisition
View Spec PDF

Are You Looking for These?

Part #: OXY-MRI-SENSOR
Categories: MRI Magnetic Resonance Imaging - Research
Subcategories: Transducers - Research

Recommended Items

Spotlight On
Mobita wearable 32-channel EEG

Mobita 32-Channel Wireless EEG System

This Mobita wearable physiological signal amplifier system records 32 channels of high-fidelity wireless EEG data with water electrodes. The system includes: Mobita base unit with onboard 3D accelerometer & trigger channel ConfiCap™ configured for 32-Channel EEG Headcap with 32 grommets for Water Based Electrodes Water Based Electrodes AcqKnowledge software This Mobita® System is uniquely suited to record wireless EEG for a variety of applications, such as […]

View All
Latest News

New Citations—VR Muscle Training, Hypertension, & Stem Cell Smile Reconstruction

Virtual Reality Muscle Training in Stroke Patients: Muscle weakening of the lower extremities has a significant correlation with loss of balance and walking ability in stroke patients. Researchers at Sehan University studied the effect of a virtual reality-based eccentric training program on lower extremity muscle activation and balance for rehabilitation of stroke patients. BIOPAC’s EMG100C surface […]

New Citations—ECG Personal Identification, Cognitive Decline and Exercise, & Mechanical Impulses

Personal Identification: Researchers from Yonsei University recently performed a study testing the viability of using ECG signals for individual identification, much like a password or key. Their study investigated experiments that recorded ECG after exercise and estimated the recognition potential of these signals. ECG was measured from subjects using the BIOPAC MP150 data acquisition system […]

Read All
Request a Demonstration
Request a Demonstration