BIOPAC® Systems, Inc. Logo

Electrical stimulation and artifact

Here are some suggestions for overcoming the problem of stimulation artifact when applying a stimulation voltage to a muscle.
 
  1. Have the ground between the stimulating electrodes and the recording electrodes.
  2. The recording electrodes should be placed orthogonal to the stimulating electrodes.
  3. Apply the highest possible low pass filter on the amplifier. This will allow the amplifier to recover faster.
  4. During analysis, the find peak function should be used to look for EMG activity between the electrical stimuli. For example, if the stimuli are 100 msec apart and it takes 10 msec for the amplifier to recover from the stimulus a find peak from 10 to 99 msec after the interval can be used.

The stimulus artifact may never be removed completely because it is so intense. But this will not be much of an issue since the EMG signal you need for analysis falls between the spikes in the signal caused by the stimulator.

Associated Applications

Associated Disciplines

Spotlight On
Small Animal SpO2 in MRI

Small Animal SpO2 in MRI

Complete system for small animal SpO2 measurements in an MRI Small Animal Noninvasive Vital Signs Monitor Works on conscious or anesthetized subjects Patented sensor supports heart rates in the range of 90-900 BPM Works with neonatal mice up to 500 gram rats MRI sensor works in small, large and closed bore MRI environments up to 19T […]

View All
Latest News

News Citations—Respiration and Cardiovascular Activity

BIOPAC provides software and hardware that allow for research teams to record and analyze respiration activity in physiological experimentation. Here are a few notable studies in monitoring respiration and cardiovascular activity. The coupling between peripheral microcirculation and slow breathing: The purpose of this study was to investigate the coupling of breathing movements and microcirculatory blood […]

BIOPAC on 60 Minutes | Brain Hacking with Anderson Cooper

CBS News | 60 Minutes | Brain Hacking APRIL 9, 2017| Why can’t we stop looking at our smartphones? And are the designers of the apps and content on them using brain science to keep us hooked? Anderson Cooper reports.   BIOPAC users Larry D. Rosen, Ph.D. and Nancy A. Cheever, Ph.D. from California State […]

Read All
Request a Demonstration
Request a Demonstration