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Peripheral Blood Flow

When used in conjunction with an occluding cuff, electrical bioimpedance measurements on limbs can assess arterial blood flow and venous thrombosis. To prevent venous outflow without significantly changing arterial inflow, rapidly inflate the TSD120 cuff to 40-50 mmHg. The blood inflow causes an increase in the volume of the limb. To measure the arterial flow rate, use the slope of the initial impedance change. The volume change that occurs after the impedance change reaches a plateau is a measure of the compliance of the venous system. Once the volume has stabilized, quickly deflate the cuff. For thrombosis to exist in the veins, the time constant of the outflow lengthens. The percentage outflow drop can be measured directly, at any time, once the cuff pressure is released.

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